Grace Students Display Creative Works in Senior Showcase

Eight Grace College seniors have spent countless hours preparing a myriad of pieces for their showcase. Each piece highlights a different portion of the student’s personality and creative talent.

The Mount Memorial Art Gallery

The second 2018 Senior Thesis Show is on display now through February 28 in the Mount Memorial Art Gallery, 200 Seminary Dr., Winona Lake. The gallery is open to the public from 10:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 – 4 p.m. on Saturday.

This senior art exhibit will showcase the work of students Mitchell Acton, Sarah Adams, Chandler Elliott, Hailey Hughes, Angelica Nolan, Emily Teisman, Cami Weaver, Asia Weimer and Benjamin Gruber.

Mitchell Acton

Mitchell Acton’s artistry is focused on branding and corporate identity. He recognizes that many potential consumers often judge a company on their first impression: its logo. “A well-designed logo requires no explanation and is timeless,” Acton said. “When done correctly, a logo can convey a brand’s personality and spirit in an instant.” That spirit and personality is further conveyed by the brand, which encompasses all the color, type, and products that a company uses. Acton uses clean and simple designs that highlight the core values of a company while minimizing visual confusion.

Sarah Adams blends photography, videography and design in the “#beautyisYou” campaign. Inspired by companies

like Aerie and Dove, who have taken steps to combat unhealthy cultural body norms, the campaign’s focus is to show the viewer that there is no single definition of beauty. While some may focus on a person’s physical appearance, others look to simple things in their surroundings. “I want my viewers to leave inspired and confident,” said Adams.

Sarah Adams

Chandler Elliott cannot imagine a world without photographs. They retain emotions, open doors to cherished moments in the past, and show stories in ways that words cannot. Her work uses contrasts in natural light and color to capture moments and people that reveal narratives and important experiences in the lives of her subjects. “I believe photography is about being able to tell a story through just one image,” Elliott said.

Hailey Hughes says she naturally fell into natural light photography, taking inspiration from photographers like Ansel Adams and Annie Liebovitz. Her first photography book was Liebovitz’s “At Work,” the story of Liebovitz’s journey with photography and her lessons from it. One of challenges that Hughes had to overcome for her portfolio was the weather, which could change overnight and mean a photography session needed to be rescheduled. However, these challenges gave Hughes an opportunity to expand her skills and become comfortable with any circumstance for a shoot.

Angelica Nolan approaches art from a slightly different perspective than her peers; she is a web design and development major. Her focus is on making websites functional and user-friendly, which incorporates the elements of art and design. Nolan has been incredibly successful in her field, having six years of experience with HTML5 and CSS3 in addition to earning a state championship with a Business Professionals of America web design team.

Emily Teisman cherishes her ability to freeze time. As a portrait photographer, she captures the emotions and details of her subjects, while giving viewers enough time to wonder about and examine the events of the moment or the subject’s ideas. “I love strong, rich photos, and I believe the lighting and the tones of colors present a piece of the story,” said Teisman.

Fashion and fine arts have captivated Cami Weaver since she was a child. Her elementary notebooks were filled with sketches of outfits drawn during recess, and that passion for innovating beautiful garments has stayed with her. She has expanded past simple notebooks sketches, now using drawings, painting, photography and 3D-design to put together her pieces and their color schemes.

Asia Weimer tells stories. Her stories are created with watercolor paints, block carvings, or charcoal, and the narratives present nuanced concepts with beauty to inspire empathy and curiosity in viewers. “Often my work is representative of my own personal development,” said Weimer. “We’re all asking the same questions and wanting answers.” The pinnacle of her showcase is a 36-page picture book, “Apartment Friends,” which invites readers into the life of a little boy who befriends a girl who does not speak his language.

Benjamin Gruber has worked with a variety of mediums from print to paint to photography. Looking back, he realizes that each piece was an attempt to capture the natural beauty in God’s creation. Though he puts intense hues and intricate detail into his pieces, his work only captures a portion of the beauty from the greatest Creator and Designer. Gruber said, “My artwork not only shows my love for God and His nature, but is a constant reminder that He created even me.”

Taking inspiration from Edgar Degas, Daniel Guyton wants his work “to provoke deeper thoughts on issues that go unconsidered.” Much of his work was cfreated to hone his skills as a designer, photographer, and videographer, but his film pieces, “Everyday Exchanges” and “Put Asunder” were created as commentary on the issues Guyton sees with Western society.

For more information about upcoming art exhibits and the Department of Visual, Performing and Media Arts at Grace College, visit or call 574.372.5100, ext. 6024.

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